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Canyon Diablo Nickel-Iron Meteorites Gallery 1

Canyon Diablo meteorites are fragments of the meteorite that created the Barringer Crater, also known as Meteor Crater, located between the present-day towns of Flagstaff and Winslow in northern Arizona, USA. This meteorite's namesake is the old West boom town of Canyon Diablo located on the edge of the arroyo Canyon Diablo about 12 miles northwest of the crater, the closest community to the impact site when scientific workers began investigating it in the 1890s.

Barringer Crater was created by an iron meteorite impact approximately 50,000 years ago and is the most well known and studied meteorite crater on Earth. The meteorite is estimated to have spanned about 150 feet across and to have weighed several hundred thousand tons. Traveling at 30,000 to 40,000 miles per hour, upon impact it exploded with a force equivalent to 20 megatons of TNT, creating pressures as high as 20 million pounds per square inch. Millions of tons of limestone and sandstone were blasted out of the crater, covering the surrounding area with a blanket of shattered, pulverized and partially melted rock mixed with fragments of meteoritic iron.

From the late 19th to the mid-20th century, Barringer Crater was at the center of a long scientific dispute over its origin and the idea of terrestrial impact craters. In 1891, the mineralogist Albert E. Foote presented the first scientific paper about the meteorites of Northern Arizona. In 1892, Grove Karl Gilbert, chief geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey, investigated the crater, concluding it was the result of a volcanic steam explosion, and that the meteorites found in its vicinity were coincidental. Gilbert's attribution of the crater to volcanic processes was generally accepted by other contemporary geologists, with the close proximity of the San Francisco volcanic field in Northern Arizona lending further credence to his conclusions.

In 1903, mining engineer and businessman Daniel M. Barringer became convinced the crater had been produced by the impact of a meteorite, and he believed a large mass of iron with significant commercial value existed beneath the crater. His Standard Iron Company staked a mining claim to the land, and Barringer spent over 20 years of fruitless drilling attempting to locate it while he and other proponents argued the case for its impact origin. In spite of mounting evidence supporting the impactists, the geological community's skepticism continued into the 1950s. It was not until the 1960s that research by Eugene M. Shoemaker settled the debate and Barringer Crater became the first terrestrial impact crater widely recognized as such by the scientific community. A pivotal discovery was the presence in the crater of the minerals coesite and stishovite, rare forms of silica found only where quartz-bearing rocks have been instantaneously shocked with energies and pressures equivalent to a nuclear explosion.

It is now known that the main mass of the meteorite sought by Daniel Barringer was vaporized upon impact into a superheated cloud of nearly atomized mist of molten metal that condensed into small metallic spheroids distributed in and beyond the ejecta field surrounding the crater.

Canyon Diablo is dominantly composed of iron-nickel metal and is classified as a coarse octahedrite belonging to the main group (MG) of the IAB complex. Minerals reported from Canyon Diablo include chromite, cohenite, daubréelite, diamond, lonsdaleite, graphite, haxonite, kamacite, moissanite, schreibersite, taenite, and troilite. Specimens may contain troilite-graphite nodules with metal veins and small diamonds.

Specimens of Canyon Diablo are highly collectable and sought after due to the role and significance of this meteorite in the evolution scientific thought regarding terrestrial impact craters.


Meteorite62 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite - $130.40
 
Meteorite62 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite Locality: Meteor Crater, Arizona
Approximate Size: 46.0mm long x 28.5mm wide x 17.2mm thick. Please note the image at left may be larger than life to help show the fine details.
Approximate Weight: 79.0 grams

Due to their historical significance, Canyon Diablo meteorites are much sought after by collectors and are becoming increasingly difficult to source.

This Canyon Diablo specimen will make an appreciated addition to any space rock collection.


Meteorite64 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite - $103.60
 
Meteorite64 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite Locality: Meteor Crater, Arizona
Approximate Size: 41.7mm long x 31.3mm wide x 16.1mm thick. Please note the image at left may be larger than life to help show the fine details.
Approximate Weight: 62.7 grams

Due to their historical significance, Canyon Diablo meteorites are much sought after by collectors and are becoming increasingly difficult to source.

This Canyon Diablo specimen will make an appreciated addition to any space rock collection.


Meteorite65 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite - $83.80
 
Meteorite65 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite Locality: Meteor Crater, Arizona
Approximate Size: 42.6mm long x 26.5mm wide x 21.7mm thick. Please note the image at left may be larger than life to help show the fine details.
Approximate Weight: 50.8 grams

Due to their historical significance, Canyon Diablo meteorites are much sought after by collectors and are becoming increasingly difficult to source.

This Canyon Diablo specimen will make an appreciated addition to any space rock collection.


Meteorite66 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite - $61.20
 
Meteorite66 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite Locality: Meteor Crater, Arizona
Approximate Size: 34.4mm long x 22.2mm wide x 12.1mm thick. Please note the image at left may be larger than life to help show the fine details.
Approximate Weight: 30.6 grams

Due to their historical significance, Canyon Diablo meteorites are much sought after by collectors and are becoming increasingly difficult to source.

This Canyon Diablo specimen will make an appreciated addition to any space rock collection.


Meteorite67 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite - $40.20
 
Meteorite67 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite Locality: Meteor Crater, Arizona
Approximate Size: 30.4mm long x 18.8mm wide x 14.8mm thick. Please note the image at left may be larger than life to help show the fine details.
Approximate Weight: 20.1 grams

Due to their historical significance, Canyon Diablo meteorites are much sought after by collectors and are becoming increasingly difficult to source.

This Canyon Diablo specimen will make an appreciated addition to any space rock collection.


Meteorite69 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite - $29.00 RESERVED
Meteorite69 - Canyon Diablo Nickle-Iron Meteorite Locality: Meteor Crater, Arizona
Approximate Size: 24.3mm long x 16.2mm wide x 13.4mm thick. Please note the image at left may be larger than life to help show the fine details.
Approximate Weight: 14.5 grams

Due to their historical significance, Canyon Diablo meteorites are much sought after by collectors and are becoming increasingly difficult to source.

This Canyon Diablo specimen will make an appreciated addition to any space rock collection.

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